GRAY'S DOBERMANS,ROTTWEILER & DANES - AKC REG DOBERMAN'S,ROTTWEILER & DANES
 THE DOBERMAN..... 
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Temperament: If properly socialized, Doberman Pinschers get along well with children, other dogs, and other household pets. Doberman Pinschers should be socialized when young. They are uncomfortable with strangers and do not take kindly to unwanted visitors. Dobes require a dominant owner to ensure they do not become overly aggressive. They are honorable, fearless, and devoted, making fine companions.
Care: The Doberman Pinscher must have its claws kept short. The teeth should be brushed regularly and checked periodically for tartar. Remove dead hairs from the Doberman Pinscher’s coat with a knobbed rubber glove during shedding. Dobes are susceptible to Von Willebrand disease (a blood disorder), hip dysplasia, and . They are also sensitive to cold, and should not be left to live outdoors in cold climates. The white Doberman Pinscher may be more susceptible to deafness or blindness, but this is disputed. The Doberman Pinscher has a life span of 8-12 years, and has litters of 3-8 pups.
Training: The Doberman Pinscher must be trained carefully, thoroughly, and consistently. One should never hit a Doberman Pinscher, and should avoid pressuring the dog during the early stages of training. Females may be more stubborn than males.
Activity: The speed and tremendous stamina of the Doberman Pinscher make it ideal for a variety of outdoor sports. It requires frequent exercise and will not be satisfied with daily walks around the neighborhood.Doberman's are not suited for apartment life. 
 
THE ROTTWEILER:

Character: The Rottweiler is brave, loyal, obedient, protective, watchful, and strong. It will risk life and limb to defend its family. Rottweilers are powerful and usually serious, requiring frequent attention. Rotties are often silent, observant, and serene, but females may bark more often than males.
Temperament: If properly socialized, a Rottweiler makes a good playmate for children and gets along well with cats and other household animals. This is all contingent on whether the dog has had positive experiences with them when young, however.
Care: The Rottweiler requires little coat maintenance; use a rubber glove to remove hair when the Rottie sheds. The ears must be kept clean, and the claws must be kept short. The Rottweiler enjoys cold or cool weather, but shelter must be provided. Rotties need frequent socialization. They tend to overeat and snore, so sharing a doghouse will probably be out of the question. Rotties live 10-12 years and may have large litters of 12 or more puppies.
Training: The dominant nature of the Rottweiler makes it necessary that its trainer is calm, consistent, firm, and fair. Rottweilers are eager to learn, and obedience training is an absolute requirement. The Rottweiler is very intelligent and can excel at a variety of sports in addition to its capacity as a guard dog and watch dog.
Activity: The Rottweiler requires daily exercise. Take it with you to run in the open country or the woods, as it does not wish to wander far from its family. Rotties also love to swim, run beside a bicycle, or catch a ball. Over exercising a Rottweiler is just about impossible, so have at it!
 &  THE GREAT DANE
 
Character: Great Danes are affectionate, calm, loyal, and intelligent. They do not bark much, but make great watchdogs. The Great Dane’s ‘gentle giant’ nickname is well earned by its loving, quiet persona. Some Great Danes may drool.
Temperament: The Great Dane gets along well with children, other dogs, and any household pets. Some Great Danes are dominant with other dogs of the same sex or have a high prey instinct with small cats. Great Danes should be socialized when young. The Great Dane is usually wary around strangers, but will welcome friends of the family.
Care: The Great Dane should be brushed with a rubber brush when shedding to remove dead hairs. Great Danes need a sizable soft place to lie down indoors. Proper nutrition and avoidance of excessive exercise is required when this breed is young. Great Danes are prone to hip dysplasia and bloat, the latter of which can be prevented by placing the food dish on an elevated platform, spacing meals throughout the day, and avoiding exercise immediately after meals. The Great Dane has a lifespan of 8-12 years.
Training: The Great Dane requires a dominant but not overly harsh trainer. It must be trained early not to pull on the leash, because it grows to a very large size. Obedience training when young is highly recommended for the Great Dane.
Activity: The Great Dane needs a moderate amount of exercise when fully grown; do not over exercise when young. It should be taken on a daily walk or allowed to play in a large yard. Apartment life may not be practical for the Great Dane due to its large size.

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